Category Archives: HTTP Status Coops

HTTP Status Coop – 307 Temporary Redirect

Sixth in the HTTP Status Coop series is 307 Temporary Redirect!

307TempRedirect_img

In this case, the request should be repeated with another URI; however, future requests should still use the original URI. In contrast to how 302 was historically implemented, the request method is not allowed to be changed when reissuing the original request. For example, a POST request should be repeated using another POST request.

via Wikipedia

My husband, lovingly redirecting Cooper out of the snow ūüėÄ


For the entire HTTP Status Coop series that’s been released so far, head over to the HTTP Status Coop page on my blog!

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HTTP Status Coop – 305 Use Proxy

Fifth in the HTTP Status Coop series – 305 Use Proxy!

305UseProxy_img

The requested resource is available only through a proxy, the address for which is provided in the response. Many HTTP clients (such as Mozilla[26] and Internet Explorer) do not correctly handle responses with this status code, primarily for security reasons.

via Wikipedia

This¬† is a photo of my custom Big Head (from Fathead) of Cooper, that sits at my desk! It’s my proxy for interacting with my dog while at work ūüėÄ


For the entire HTTP Status Coop series that’s been released so far, head over to the HTTP Status Coop page on my blog!

HTTP Status Coop – 303 See Other

Fourth post in the HTTP Status Coop series – 303 See Other!

303SeeOther_img

The response to the request can be found under another URI using the GET method. When received in response to a POST (or PUT/DELETE), the client should presume that the server has received the data and should issue a new GET request to the given URI.

via Wikipedia


For the entire HTTP Status Coop series that’s been released so far, head over to the HTTP Status Coop page on my blog!

HTTP Status Coop – 206 Partial Content

Third post in the HTTP Status Coop series – 206 Partial Content!

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The server is delivering only part of the resource (byte serving) due to a range header sent by the client. The range header is used by HTTP clients to enable resuming of interrupted downloads, or split a download into multiple simultaneous streams.

via Wikipedia

 

HTTP Status Coop – 202 Accepted

Second post in the HTTP Status Coops – 202 Accepted!

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The request has been accepted for processing, but the processing has not been completed. The request might or might not be eventually acted upon, and may be disallowed when processing occurs.

via Wikipedia

I chose this photo because it both shows that Cooper was accepted into our family, and he’s accepted that he’ll be made to wear sweaters. His pig has also been accepted as his favorite toy…

HTTP Status… Coops?

In going back over my Testing RESTful Web Services talk prior to presenting at Targeting Quality, I decided that the HTTP Status Cats I was using on one of my slides just didn’t feel right. I was already using my dog in my talk, so why not make some up?

I’m calling them HTTP Status Coops because his name is Cooper. I’ll roll them out once a week or so here, in order. The list is incomplete as of now, but I’ll keep adding to them as long as Cooper keeps being goofy!

200 OK

200Ok_img

Standard response for successful HTTP requests. The actual response will depend on the request method used. In a GET request, the response will contain an entity corresponding to the requested resource. In a POST request, the response will contain an entity describing or containing the result of the action.

via Wikipedia

This one was difficult because there are SO MANY PICTURES of Cooper that are him being 200 OK. He’s so expressive and has a huge smile. But this photo won out.